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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 66 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the last 40 years: ivan, dennis, katrina. and katrina i was the commander of the medical forces in pensacola, florida, and i owned the branch clinics that existed in new orleans, pascagula and gulf port, mississippi. we thought we had dodged the bullet and then the levies broke and who would have predicted that there was a sea of humanity in the super dome that basically was in extreme miss? who would have predicted in this day and age we would lose many, many people based on the fact they couldn't be medevacked, that the hospitals themselves had been flooded and the hospital staff was having to carry critically ill patients up to the top floors to avoid the water that was filling in the rooms. who would have predicted that? and were we set up to handle that? and who would have predicted in the early goings there would be civic disorder and civic disobedience and lack of command and control and then the military came there and provided that stability for a while until the civic authorities took over and eventually got things moving in a fairly organized continuum. we learned
? >> guest: i started after hurricane katrina. host mark what caused you to do this? >> guest: it was one of those times in my life when i didn't know what i was doing, and that this opportunity came up and i thought was perfect because i had no skills whatsoever. i did whatever they ask for in skilled people come in, they clean up than they do the serious work. so we did very basic labor. but it was necessary later. >> host: did you feel that your two weeks in new orleans was worthy? >> guest: guesstimate everywhere that i went from a question that. i said, what can you really do in two weeks? beyond the fact that yes, it is helpful to paint a house, but there was an intangible quality that it was good to be in new orleans nine months after hurricane katrina. people were so happy to have tourists back in people in the city. >> host: ken budd, what were you doing for a living prior to volunteering? >> guest: i was an editor and i was an editor in washington dc and i am still doing the same job. >> host: how did you get all that time off? could use your vacation time. >> guest: yes, i use
overseas and with hurricane katrina down in new orleans, and they say it does not look much different. walking around and having it be dead silent and hearing the hissing of natural gas coming out of the ground, we are still as of yesterday in search and rescue mode to be sure everyone is out of their house and safe before they allow people to come back. it is a very frustrating time. i can tell you what he was talking about on the earlier call, i had the opportunity last night to talk to some people in the shelters and they are amazed at the amount of people willing to help, total strangers. random citizens donating goods to try to help their fellow man. it is unfortunate it takes a tragic event like this to bring the best out of people. host: what is the best way the federal government can help your district? guest: first of all, the president has been doing everything he needed to do along with the governor in giving the governor of the tools that we need here in new jersey to get this process started. it is going to be a multi-year process to get us headed back in the right direct
after hurricane katrina, which we all know will be probably the greatest civil engineering set of blunders that our country has made in our country's history. and what we all learn from hurricane katrina is what happens when we don't have a community that is prepared and a set of relationships that is ready to be hit by the big one. which leads me to the third reason why i wake up at night. the neighborhoods that i represent in the northeast not only represent the oldest neighborhoods in our city, but some of the most vulnerable. we have some of the poorest residents. half of my district are recent immigrants who are mono lingual. i have hundreds of constituents who live in buildings that contain them where they live three, four, five people in a room that might be no larger than 10 by 15 feet, in buildings that are absolutely prone to earthquake, fire, and the next major disaster. and, so, i was asked to just mention if i had three things that i want you to tell us as your civilian leaders. the first has to do with how to deal with community shock. two nights ago as a couple o
of other disasters, from hurricane katrina, to joplin, now think of this. the people in all three of those places are reaching out to help those suffering in those regions tonight. tonight, their story from janet shamlian. >> reporter: hundreds of miles from the despair, everything from diapers to batteries, collected from the people of louisiana, meant for people in new jersey. >> we know what they're suffering in new jersey, we just wanted to do something to help. >> reporter: the effort started simply, at first, just messages of support. like these from hurricane katrina survivors, images that quickly went viral, then, more help. >> some of the first people we saw down here were firefighters from new york, the new york police department and folks from new jersey. everybody came down here and helped us, it is time to help everybody back. >> reporter: there is a similar feeling from joplin, missouri, which was devastated by the tornado. even people living in the fema trailers, the community wanted to help. >> it brought back a lot of memories. >> reporter: lisa dunn and her family lost th
, the tales it could tell. listen to this, one that has gone back and forth from louisiana, katrina, and new york for 9/11 and back. now back again the brotherhood of firefighters that is straight ahead. >> those are two cities that share tragedy, have tragedy in common. katrina down there. 9/11 up here. now another one with sandy. so that -- the bond, the fire truck, represents that. >>> also, we'll lighten the mood a little bit in "the skinny," she says, maybe not too much. she is going to be fine. talking about brooke burke from abc's "dancing with the stars," when the word cancer is involved we'll have to send her our very best thoughts and warm wishes. details of her condition. she is going to be okay the important thing. stay tuned for details coming up on that in "the skinny". >> what her doctors are telling her. our prayers and thoughts go out to her and her family. first, victims and relatives of those who died were in the courtroom as a judge reaffirmed that jared loughner would never again be a free man. >>> part of a plea deal, loughner was sentenced to seven consecutive life ter
and disasters i'm absolutely confronted by these two americas, the katrina/fema reaction and the sandy/fema reaction and the reality is to argue there hasn't been a significant political response to the significance of fema by different governments and it's not split down party lines. it's simply not true. there was a really great article in "mother jones" that took you through -- >> the development of fema competence. >> right. and who had headed fema and the way that presidents had appointed those fema heads were directly related to how they perceived their significance. so, for example, george bush actually allocated michael brown who was the former -- i just had to read this out, because i was just blown away. michael brown who was the former commissioner of judges and stewards for the international arabian horse association, that's who headed fema. clinton was the first -- was the first president to allocate the fema head who actually had experience -- >> disaster. >> -- disaster management. it's not political. it's about poverty. it's about race. and when we think about disaster
up in flames and four other houses. >> we think back about katrina and what a big impact that was on our country, we rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm, we think of the aftermath. right now we're in the aftermath period in terms of sandy. tell me how you feel about that. and before we get to rebuilding, people taking care of continuing damage right now, how do you assess the coordination between the state, federal, and local municipalities? >> i think we're doing very well. i think the president's response has been terrific, really. it's been coordinated unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard governor christie, who is a republican with president obama working together, and that's how it's been from the president, to the governor, to the counties and the towns. one of the things that i did today was talk to fema about trying to get an office and staff person in various parts of the district today, and they're working on it, and with the money that comes to downs for recovery to rebuild board walks or municipal buildings, i t
franklin. after katrina, you were a native of new orleans, you were appointed the vice chairman of the louisiana recovery authority and the job was to handle funds that were being disbursed by the federal government. in watching the rebuilding of new orleans and this whole process, what do you think that you learned that applies to what's going on now in new york and new jersey? >> three things. first of all, leadership matters. if you look at what's happening in new york and new jersey now organization view great leaders, michael bloomberg, deputy mayor bob steele, governor cuomo, governor chris christie. the president, obama, has been very involved. when we went through katrina, we were all back down in new orleans, it wasn't that strong of leadership. ray nagin was the mayor, sometimes not to be found. so i saw the importance of people who take charge and say i'm going to run into this crisis and i'm going to help solve it. secondly, it reminded us that we're all in the same boat together. this election is somewhat about the age-old tension between, all right, we're all indiv
through hurricane katrina know a thing or two about getting back on your feet. so, hundreds of them packed up and drove east to staten island, new york, to help those recovering from superstorm sandy. they say they're just returning the kindness that so many new yorkers showed them in their time of need. dan bowens of wnyw has more. >> new york, staten island, sandy ruined hundreds of homes and we found volunteers working hard to pick up the pieces. >> and the water height is where this is. >> flood waters reached above the windows inside randy's house and several people he didn't know helped him clear out the debris. >> touching, heart warming is not near enough a ward to describe how you feel when these things are going on. and people tyke time out of their life. >> and the neighbor was feeling overwelcomed, debris everywhere in the back yard and then this group just showed up and started cleaning. >> without the 25 hands with me, i wouldn't be able to do anything. >> among the hundreds of workers and volunteers, who come to staten island today and there are hundreds assisting with the c
a comparison with hurricane katrina. i want to use it as an analogy. but the analogy here that might be helpful, we think back to katrina and what that meant to us as a nation. we very rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm. right now we are in the aftermath period of this superstorm, sandy. how do you feel in terms of dealing with the aftermath, describing those explosions, these ongoing worries. before we get to rebuilding, rescuing people, taking care of continuing damage right now. how would you assess the response and the coordination between the federal government, the state government, municipalities. how are we doing? >> i think we're doing very well. i mean, you heard the president, and i have to say that i think his response has been terrific, really. and it's been coordinated, unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard, you know, governor christie, who's a republican, with president obama, working together. and that's how it's been, from the president to the governor, all the way down to the county and the towns. so one of the things that i di
all of this living through this for a second time is proof of how katrina changed the nation's psychology when it comes to storms. >> yes. >> how many lessons have been learned, dark days along the gulf coast in '05. see it playing out. closest thing to katrina since '05. you are seeing the country changed after the storm, even response on every level has changed as well. interesting to watch, yet again for sure. >> yeah. >> coming up next, images are almost too much for adults to comprehend. for children, the pictures from sandy could be downright heartbreaking and confusing. >> we'll show you what one familiar fuzzy face is doing to help them understand. ♪ we have all been assaulted by the sights and sound of hurricane sandy. they can be hard for an adult but overwhelming for a child. >> imagine what it is like for kids. gma anchor josh elliott has this story. >> reporter: we adults called it a super storm. amidst the ferocity of nature's wrath, it was just plain scary. how do you talk to kids about getting through the storm of the century. we got together with a panel of
of the group's system of levies that were installed in new orleans in the gulf coast after katrina. >> people asked about located -- katrina and the rebuilding. not smart to build on an ocean. will the flood-prone areas be redefined, and will reveal did occur outside areas? -- will the rebuilding occur outside those areas? guest: this will be a tricky question going forward. along the jersey shore, and iconic part of their coast, a huge industry for them. they are saying it needs to be rebuilt. there are other places in new york city, mayor michael bloomberg is saying that we need to reevaluate places to rebuild and make sure we move around a little bit. especially with the storm coming at a time when state and local governments are so strapped for money. that is something that is being talked about, and i think there are certain places where you can see development has increased in recent years that may have made flooding worse. this is something you hear anecdotally of the ground. talk to people on staten island where there was very bad flooding. they say 40 years ago the neighborhood ports
should have said with katrina. they have used the ploy and bush. hey i was told not to come in there that they didn't need the gridlock. this proves it. if you think. >> bill: let me set it up, that bloomberg told president obama and dennis miller not to come to new york. miller defied him but the president did not because the president is doing lump lomb lombado. >> in a heavily populated metropolitan area. they both start with new, new orleans or new york. the one mayor was hiding out in the penthouse trying to stay soft. >> bill: you couldn't freeze traffic zones because traffic isn't moving. >> i was 10 blocks away, billy. i gave up after 40 minutes and just walked over. >> bill: you can't go anywhere because the subways are out. >> just remember that folks when they tell you they were heartless and bush was heartless. they don't want the president in major area. good for bloomberg for saying it. >> bill: do you think that the hurricane is going to have any influence on the presidential vote next week? >> no. but i would watch west virginia. you know, they often say the
call that had to be made in new orleans after katrina with mardi gras. >> huge debate. the difference was -- the storm in august. mardi gras was in february. months between. now days between. >> i know. >> i don't know. i don't know. a tough call here. it is going to go on. the mayor said it is. those of you coming into the city to do it. run hard. run well. we'll be back with more after this. >> announcer: this is abc's "world news now." informing insomniacs for two decades. >>> this morning on "world news now," a presidential promise of help in the heart of the hurricane devastation. >> president obama and new jersey governor chris christie stood side by side as they toured the destruction and talks with the victims of sandy. it's thursday, november 1st. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good thursday morning, i'm sunny hostin. paula faris is on assignment. >> always good to have you as the co-pilot here. >> so good to be here. >> there's power here and there's heat which is good. >> yes. both of which i do not have at home. >> soldiering through. welcome b
by new york's bravest following katrina. those tragedies kind of bonding those cities. nice to see that for sure. use all the help they can get. >> paying it forward coming full circle. >>> a half billion dollars worth of dreams, powerball players are lining up and dreaming of living large. what you told us that you would really do with $500 million. i have to say we appreciate the honesty. >> that's for sure. >>> also, the last dance. "dancing with the stars" crowns an all-star winner and all will be revealed coming up in "the skinny." don't want to miss that. >>> but we do begin with breaking news this morning about that horrific factory fire in bangladesh. >> this is hard to even get your mind around. police have arrested three managers and accused them of locking the doors so the workers could not get out. the 112 people died in the fire, records show workers made clothes for wal-mart, sears as well as our parent company disney. >> bangladesh police say the managers stopped workers from leaving saying the alarm was just a routine fire drill. police also questioned the company's
capitol. >> plus, giving back with a helping hand and a hot meal. victims of hurricane katrina say it's their turn to make a difference in the aftermath of super storm sandy. fox 5 morning news at 7:00 starts right now. >> this is fox 5 morning news. >> wow. good morning to you. it's monday november 12th , 2012. the sun is peaking through the clouds there. >> pretty. >> tucker says it's going to be a nice day at least for a little while. it is monday november 12th. good morning to you. >> and i'm allison seymour. i can't wait another second. what is this going on? >> what else do you need to know? >> i don't have a degree so it's not credible. >> he does have one degree. >> i do have a degree. >> wisdom and i will put this forecast together for you. it's going to be a nice start but if you want the sun enjoy the next couple hours. eventually rain showers associated with our next cold front that is moving through indiana and ohio. not going to rain today but it will start to turn cloudy by late morning and this afternoon. much of your day will fay tour cloud cover. one more very mil
on the show during katrina a long island church sent aid to louisiana and now the favor is being returned. >> and millions spent to it set up food stamp application sites. wait until you hear how much. based on this chart ? don't rush into it, i'm not looking for the fastest answer. obviously verizon. okay, i have a different chart. going that way, does that make a difference ? look at verizon. it's so much more than the other ones. so what if we just changed the format altogether ? isn't that the exact same thing ? it's pretty clear. still sticking with verizon. verizon. more 4g lte coverage than all other networks combined. aww, nowell, i'll do the shoppi. if you do the shipping. shipping's a hassle. i'll go to the mall. hey. hi. you know, holiday shipping's easy with priority mail flat rate boxes from the postal service. if it fits, it ships anywhere in the country for low flat rate. yea, i know. oh, you're good. good luck! priority mail flat rate boxes. online pricing starts at $5.15. only from the postal service. can you help me with something? nope! good talk. [ male announcer ] or
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 66 (some duplicates have been removed)